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Kenya election results spark scattered protests

Kenya election results spark scattered protests
From CBC - August 12, 2017

Kenyan police shot and killed two people during riots by opposition supporters after President Uhuru Kenyatta was declared the winner in elections overshadowed by fraud allegations, authorities said Saturday, while a father said his 9-year-old daughter was killed by a stray bullet in the capital.

The two police shootings occurred on the outskirts of Kisumu, a city where opposition leader Raila Odinga has strong support, according to Leonard Katana, a regional police commander. Another five people were injured by gunfire in Kisumu, Katana said.

Also Saturday, Kenyan police opened fire to disperse opposition protesters who blocked roads and set up burning barricades in a slum in Nairobi, the capital. Associated Press photographers saw police charging demonstrators and firing live rounds and tear gas in the Mathare area. Protesters, some with rocks or sticks, ran for cover as they came under fire in another Nairobi slum, Kibera.

In Mathare, Wycliff Mokaya told The Associated Press his 9-year-old daughter was killed by a stray bullet while on their third-floor balcony.

"I was watching her play with her friends when she suddenly fell down," Mokaya said. "She was my only hope."

Most of the country of 45 million people was calm the day after the election commission announced that Kenyatta, whose father was Kenya's first president after independence from British colonial rule, had won a second, five-year term. In a victory speech, Kenyatta said he was extending a "hand of friendship" to the opposition, which alleged that the election commission's database had been hacked and results were manipulated against Odinga.

Kenyatta won with a decisive 54 per cent of the vote to nearly 45 per cent for Odinga, but the bitter dispute over the integrity of the election process tempered what many Kenyans had hoped would be a celebration of democracy in a regional power known for its economic promise and long-term stability.

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