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Top Ayatollah Blames Social Media for Iran's Unrest

Top Ayatollah Blames Social Media for Iran's Unrest
From TIME - January 5, 2018

(DUBAI, United Arab Emirates)A hard-line cleric leading Friday prayers in Irans capital called on the Islamic Republic to build its own social media, blaming popular international messaging apps for the unrest that accompanied days of protests over the countrys flagging economy.

The demonstrations began on Dec. 28 and quickly spread across the country, prompting the government to suspend access to the messaging app Telegram, which was being used to publicize the protests, and briefly block the Instagram photo-sharing site. Twitter and Facebook were already banned.

With travel restricted across Iran, a nation of 80 million people roughly two-and-a-half times the size of Texas, online videos and images posted by activists have provided some of the only glimpses into the demonstrations, the largest in nearly a decade, which have mainly been held in the provinces.

Such images only provide a limited view of events on the ground, and can be easily manipulated. All of Irans radio and television stations are state-run.

Cyberspace was kindling the fire of the battle, Ayatollah Ahmad Khatami told thousands of worshippers gathered in Tehran. When cyberspace was closed down, the sedition was stopped. The nation does not support a social network that has its key in the hands of the United States.

Amid the unrest and anti-government rallies that began last week, Iran has also seen three days of pro-government demonstrations, with crowds in the tens of thousands. A similar rally followed Friday prayers in Tehran.

On Thursday, Interior Minister Abdolreza Rahmani Fazli said about 42,000 people at most took part in the week of anti-government protests, saying they went on as long as they did because of the leniency, restrain, tolerance and interaction of the government. He did not elaborate.

Fazlis comments marked the first government estimate of participation in the protests and appeared timed so authorities could contrast it against the mass crowds brought together for the pro-government demonstrations.

The governments move to block Telegram may have seriously curtailed protesters ability to organize. The app boasts an estimated 48 million users in Iran, more than half the population.

Communication blackouts constitute a serious violation of fundamental rights, a group of United Nations human rights experts warned in a statement Friday.

The White House has acknowledged looking at ways to help Iranian protesters access social media, but hasnt made any decisions on how to do so. President Donald Trump has repeatedly tweeted praise for the protesters, infuriating Iranian officials.

Iran briefly blocked Instagram before restoring access. Iran also has restored access to WeChat, a Chinese messaging app.

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