Supreme Court case could lead to First Nations role in law-making

Supreme Court case could lead to First Nations role in law-making
From CTV - January 14, 2018

OTTAWA -- The Supreme Court of Canada is to begin hearings Monday in an appeal that could force lawmakers across the country to give First Nations a role in drafting legislation that affects treaty rights.

"This case is tremendously significant whichever way it comes out," said Dwight Newman, a law professor at the University of Saskatchewan.

It could "fundamentally transform how law is made in Canada," he said.

The court is to hear a challenge by the Mikisew Cree First Nation in northern Alberta. It seeks a judicial review of changes made under the previous Harper government to the Fisheries Act, the Species At Risk Act, the Navigable Waters Protection Act and the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act.

The First Nation argues that because the changes were likely to affect its treaty rights, the government had a constitutional duty to consult before making them.

Cases on the Crown's duty to consult appear regularly, but they usually concern decisions made by regulatory bodies. This one seeks to extend that duty to law-making.

"Rather than being consultation about a particular (regulatory) decision, it's a consultation about making the rules," said lawyer Robert Janes, who will represent the Mikisew.

Janes argues that First Nations are often kept from discussing their real issues before regulatory boards.

"The place to deal with larger issues that First Nations often want to deal with are when the statutes are being designed. If you do not deal with that in the design, the (regulator) does not have the tools to deal with the problem when it comes up."

Legislation creating Alberta's energy regulator, for example, specifically blocks the agency from considering treaty rights, which are the root of most Indigenous concerns with energy development in the province.

Ensuring First Nations have a voice when laws are drafted will lead to better legislation, argues Janes.


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